• Merkel seeks 'frictionless' Brexit before meeting UK leader

    German Chancellor Angela Merkel indicated Wednesday that she's still holding out for an amicable departure of Britain from the European Union, as British Prime Minister Boris Johnson traveled to Berlin for the start of a high-stakes tour to press his case for reopening negotiations on Brexit. Positions on Britain's divorce from the EU have hardened on both sides of the English Channel, putting Britain on course for a no-deal exit at the end of October that could cause considerable economic damage to both. The EU has ruled out renegotiating the Brexit agreement it hammered out with Johnson's predecessor last year.


  • DR Congo president warns over risk to forest reserves

    DR Congo President Felix Tshisekedi has warned the country's vast forest resources -- crucial to countering global warning -- are at risk without faster development of its huge hydro-electricity potential. The Congo River basin forest region is one of the largest in the world after the Amazon and, like the South American rain forests, it plays a vital role in absorbing global carbon emissions. Along with illegal logging, the forest is threatened by the production of charcoal, a key energy resource for inhabitants because of the lack of electricity supplies.


  • Iran Tanker Helm Makes Distress Call Near Saudi Red Sea Port

    (Bloomberg) -- The Iranian oil carrier Helm experienced technical issues in the Red Sea off the Saudi port of Yanbu and the crew is working to resolve them, according to the National Iranian Tanker Co.The vessel, one of the world’s largest crude tankers, signaled distress at 6:30 a.m. Iran time on Tuesday, about 75 miles (about 121 kilometers) off of Yanbu, owner NITC said in a statement. Both the ship and crew are safe and stable, NITC said without saying whether the Helm can continue the voyage.The tanker was showing minimal movement in the immediate area on Wednesday, according to tanker-tracking data compiled by Bloomberg at 2:30 p.m. in London.Iran’s tanker fleet is under global scrutiny amid U.S. sanctions seeking to choke off the country’s crude sales. The U.S. failed in efforts to seize a loaded supertanker allegedly bound for Syria that had been blocked in Gibraltar for more than a month.That vessel, the Adrian Darya 1, is now sailing east in the Mediterranean and signaling Greece, potentially to transfer crude to other ships. Another tanker loaded crude this month in Iran with the aim of delivering oil to Syria, Fox News reported, citing unidentified intelligence officials.Transponder SignalsIranian tankers have turned off their satellite transponders intermittently in an apparent attempt to mask their voyages to supply crude. The Helm appears to have used that strategy since loading some crude in Iran in May.It’s unclear when the Helm entered the Red Sea or what was the ship’s last port of call, based on tanker-tracking data available on Bloomberg. Until this week when the vessel made the distress call, the tanker’s last known position was in the Persian Gulf in May when satellite signals showed the tanker was half full and heading for the Suez canal.The Helm, a Very Large Crude Carrier, capable of carrying about 2 million barrels of crude, is not full, according to ship tracking data compiled by Bloomberg. The tanker last reported its status as “not under command.”Another NITC tanker that encountered trouble off the Saudi coast was kept in the port of Jeddah for more than two months before leaving in July and returning to Iran this month.Separately on Wednesday, Iranian Foreign Minister Javad Zarif said that the country’s government will try to expedite the legal process over its holding of a U.K.-flagged oil tanker so “we can close this ordeal.”Iran seized the ship, the Stena Impero, in July, following the detention of the tanker that was held in Gibraltar. “This is something that we did not start but we want to end,” Zarif said at an event in Stockholm.(Updates with ship position in third paragraph, comment from Iranian foreign minister in last two paragraphs.)\--With assistance from Rafaela Lindeberg.To contact the reporters on this story: Anthony DiPaola in Dubai at adipaola@bloomberg.net;Arsalan Shahla in Tehran at ashahla@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Nayla Razzouk at nrazzouk2@bloomberg.net, Brian Wingfield, John DeaneFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


  • Iran Tanker Helm Makes Distress Call Near Saudi Red Sea Port

    (Bloomberg) -- The Iranian oil carrier Helm experienced technical issues in the Red Sea off the Saudi port of Yanbu and the crew is working to resolve them, according to the National Iranian Tanker Co.The vessel, one of the world’s largest crude tankers, signaled distress at 6:30 a.m. Iran time on Tuesday, about 75 miles (about 121 kilometers) off of Yanbu, owner NITC said in a statement. Both the ship and crew are safe and stable, NITC said without saying whether the Helm can continue the voyage.The tanker was showing minimal movement in the immediate area on Wednesday, according to tanker-tracking data compiled by Bloomberg at 2:30 p.m. in London.Iran’s tanker fleet is under global scrutiny amid U.S. sanctions seeking to choke off the country’s crude sales. The U.S. failed in efforts to seize a loaded supertanker allegedly bound for Syria that had been blocked in Gibraltar for more than a month.That vessel, the Adrian Darya 1, is now sailing east in the Mediterranean and signaling Greece, potentially to transfer crude to other ships. Another tanker loaded crude this month in Iran with the aim of delivering oil to Syria, Fox News reported, citing unidentified intelligence officials.Transponder SignalsIranian tankers have turned off their satellite transponders intermittently in an apparent attempt to mask their voyages to supply crude. The Helm appears to have used that strategy since loading some crude in Iran in May.It’s unclear when the Helm entered the Red Sea or what was the ship’s last port of call, based on tanker-tracking data available on Bloomberg. Until this week when the vessel made the distress call, the tanker’s last known position was in the Persian Gulf in May when satellite signals showed the tanker was half full and heading for the Suez canal.The Helm, a Very Large Crude Carrier, capable of carrying about 2 million barrels of crude, is not full, according to ship tracking data compiled by Bloomberg. The tanker last reported its status as “not under command.”Another NITC tanker that encountered trouble off the Saudi coast was kept in the port of Jeddah for more than two months before leaving in July and returning to Iran this month.Separately on Wednesday, Iranian Foreign Minister Javad Zarif said that the country’s government will try to expedite the legal process over its holding of a U.K.-flagged oil tanker so “we can close this ordeal.”Iran seized the ship, the Stena Impero, in July, following the detention of the tanker that was held in Gibraltar. “This is something that we did not start but we want to end,” Zarif said at an event in Stockholm.(Updates with ship position in third paragraph, comment from Iranian foreign minister in last two paragraphs.)\--With assistance from Rafaela Lindeberg.To contact the reporters on this story: Anthony DiPaola in Dubai at adipaola@bloomberg.net;Arsalan Shahla in Tehran at ashahla@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Nayla Razzouk at nrazzouk2@bloomberg.net, Brian Wingfield, John DeaneFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


  • Trump administration announces plan that would let it detain undocumented children indefinitely

    The Department of Homeland Security proposes to license its own family detention for migrants, part of an effort to dissuade illegal border crossings.


  • U.S. Drone Shot Down over Yemen

    A U.S. drone was shot down over Yemen late on Tuesday by a surface-to-air missile, U.S. officials said.Officials believe Iran provided Houthi rebels with the missile, which downed the U.S. military MQ-9 drone southeast of Sanaa, capital of Yemen.The U.S. is expected to publicly chastise Iran for the occurrence.In June, Iran shot down an unmanned American military-surveillance drone over the Gulf of Oman, further damaging the already strained relationship between the two countries.Afterwards, President Trump ordered military strikes on Iranian targets including radar and missile batteries but canceled the order at the last minute due to concerns about casualties.Iran claimed that drone had trespassed over its territory, while the U.S. argued it was in international airspace.News of the downed drone comes as Iranian foreign minister Mohammad Javad Zarif warned the U.S. Wednesday that Iran may act “unpredictably.”“Mutual unpredictability will lead to chaos. President Trump cannot expect to be unpredictable and expect others to be predictable," the foreign minister said during a speech in Stockholm.Tensions between the U.S. and Iran have been heightened since the Trump administration reimposed the sanctions lifted under the Obama administration’s nuclear deal, which the U.S. announced its withdrawal from in May of last year.


  • Have Insiders Been Selling Greater Than AB (STO:GREAT) Shares?

    It is not uncommon to see companies perform well in the years after insiders buy shares. On the other hand, we'd be...


  • Commerzbank mulls branch closures as part of broader strategy review

    German lender Commerzbank is considering closing some bank branches as it figures out a way forward after its talks to merge with rival Deutsche Bank collapsed earlier this year, people familiar with the matter said on Wednesday. Commerzbank declined to comment.


  • Is NuVasive, Inc. (NASDAQ:NUVA) Struggling With Its 7.0% Return On Capital Employed?

    Today we'll look at NuVasive, Inc. (NASDAQ:NUVA) and reflect on its potential as an investment. In particular, we'll...


  • Amazon tests water in Israel with website to attract local sellers

    E-commerce giant Amazon on Wednesday launched a Hebrew-language website to recruit local Israeli companies to sell their products via Amazon.com, the latest step toward launching a local business in the country. Sites such as Amazon have become increasingly popular in Israel where the cost of living is high, but locals currently have to order from the company's international sites, for example in the United States, Britain and Germany. There has been widespread speculation in Israel’s media that Amazon plans to open a local fulfillment center.


(ARA) - It's that time of year again - when holiday excesses leave everyone feeling overstuffed and overextended. We say we'll start fresh in the new year - we'll exercise more, we'll eat healthier, we'll get more sleep. But how about making a resolution that's just as beneficial, and may be a little easier to stick to - getting your finances in shape and being more fiscally fit?

Getting your finances in shape is especially vital for women - with longer life spans and a higher probability of taking time out from work to care for children or family, many women may have less time and resources to save for retirement. Studies show that the average working woman garners 60 percent of the retirement savings of the average male. There's no time like now to maximize the opportunities you have to create a financially secure future.

"Women have more options to take control of their financial destinies than ever before," says Linda Verba, TD Bank executive vice president of retail operations and service programs and chair of the bank's Women in Leadership committee. "Financial success comes from working toward measurable objectives, so the sooner you start on a path toward defining and attaining your financial goals, the better off you will be."

How can women work toward being financially secure and making smarter choices?

If you don't already have one, take a manageable amount of money - say, $1,000 - and start your emergency fund. Keep your emergency fund separate from your regular checking and savings accounts. Set up an automatic transfer from your regular checking account to occur on paydays - even $25 a paycheck will help your emergency fund grow.

Studies show that women see being debt-free and able to pay their bills on time as signs of financial success. Work toward being debt-free by writing down any debt you may have - such as credit cards, student loans and car payments - with the amounts owed, from least to greatest. Knocking out a couple of the lower balances first can give you a sense of achievement and provide the motivation to continue paying down debt.

Curb your impulses. There's hardly a woman alive who hasn't seen a pair of shoes she must have now, or been tired after a long day at work and gotten takeout food for dinner. Finance guru Dave Ramsey suggests finding a money mentor - someone a little older and wiser who can offer you advice, and who you can authorize to hold you accountable to your budget and check with before making large purchases.

Like the old saying goes, knowledge is power. According to a recent poll, women are often less aware of the financial tools that may be available to them than their male counterparts. Get on the path to understanding your options by starting with your bank. Many financial institutions, like TD Bank, have programs to provide financial education to their customers, and offer various seminars and workshops.

Make a New Year's resolution that will benefit you for years to come - 2012 can be the year you started toward a bright financial future.New year, new woman: Get fiscally fit with resolutions that stick
Category: Business